News

JPEG image-B88659E6F42B-1 copyUpcoming:

Geological Society of America (GSA) Fall Meeting September 25-28, 2016 in Denver, CO.

American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, December 12-16, 2016 in San Francisco, CA.

July, 2016: We have a new paper in press in Paleoceanography entitled, “Evaluating drivers of Pleistocene eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperature”. To test the proposed mechanisms for what controls eastern Pacific SST (precession-related changes in equatorial insolation, high-latitude controls including insolation or ice-sheet changes, glacial-interglacial atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations) on which timescales, we examine new and existing proxy sea-surface temperature (SST) data from the eastern Pacific and compare them with other climate datasets. This project’s approach relies on timeseries analyses over a large number of climate  cycles both before and after the mid-Pleistocene transition, ~900 thousand years ago.

In March (2016) participated in a career development workshop for early-career environmental geoscientists in Boulder, CO. We spoke about grant-writing, excellence in university teaching, and resources available to research-educators.

December, 2015: The AGU Fall Meeting is the largest gathering of Earth Scientists in the world with upwards of 24,000 attendees. I presented results from my work at Lamont-Doherty, which looks at reconstructing pCO2 from the geochemical composition of ocean sediments. Conversations and collaborations with other researchers in this and related fields are always an integral part of AGU; thanks to everyone I met and talked with there.

April, 2015: Postdoctoral Research Symposium. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory held a research symposium highlighting postdoctoral researchers. Each postdoc gave a 10-minute talk on our research. It was great to hear a little about all the different projects undertaken at Lamont.

January, 2015: Harlem Career Day. Outreach is an important component of most careers–today I met with middle-school students in Harlem as part of their career day activities to show them a little of what it is like to be an earth scientist. It was great to engage with them individually afterwards and hear more about what they are thinking in terms of careers.

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December, 2014: Along with coauthors, I published a new paper, in Paleoceanography, another journal from the American Geophysical Union. This paper details some of the data I produced in Barcelona, Spain, using materials from the Agulhas Current area. It also deals with some of the oceanic links between the temperature and salinity of the water passing from the Indian Ocean to the south Atlantic ocean and how climate is then impacted elsewhere in the world. The new data presented are geochemical estimates of sea surface temperature and salinity from sediments taken off the coast of Cape Town, South Africa.

GRL v.41 no.21

November, 2014: In November, a new paper has been published at Geophysical Research Letters titled: Dynamical changes in the tropical Pacific warm pool and zonal SST gradient during the Pleistocene. Many thanks to everyone involved, to the editors and reviewers at GRL and Wiley publishing.

October 17, 2014: This fall I am happy to commence a postdoctoral fellowship with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Last summer I wrote the proposal to work at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory on a few of the specific relationships between climate and carbon dioxide, and last winter found that it had been funded.

February 10, 2014: I’ve recently accepted a lecture position at San Francisco State University and am very glad to be back on the central coast of California, where I’ve done research in the past. I’m teaching a general education course about Oceanography that includes an exciting hands-on lab component. It is rewarding to work with people from a variety of different backgrounds; I hope to convey to this audience the importance of thinking carefully about the ocean and coastal environment. 

September 7, 2013: It has been a big year for conferences. In May I traveled to Jerusalem for a conference dedicated to ocean gateways as mechanisms of oceanic and atmospheric change. I’ve just returned from two more meetings at the end of the summer: a Goldschmidt geochemistry meeting and the International Conference on Paleoclimate. Both were informative meetings with friends and colleagues, meeting new ones, and talking about the new ideas and data that are coming online.

Geology v.41 no.1

February 10, 2013: Our recent paper on tropical climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing was published in the January issue of Geology and can be accessed on this site. Data from this project is available from Geology or the NCDC database.

November 26, 2012: I’ve just analyzed the first foraminifera isotope from my time in Barcelona. It feels good to feel the balance of laboratory work and other forms of learning and research.

October 25, 2012: Geology has just release the pre-publication of our paper on tropical climate sensitivity to atmospheric greenhouse gas forcing. Part of this is the work I presented at AGU last year and the geochemistry meeting this summer in Montreal.

About: I am a researcher in the field of Paleoclimate and Paleoceanography.  My work primarily examines geologically recent climate and oceanographic changes and concentrates on the coasts of North America and the tropical Pacific Ocean. One of the fundamental goals of this work is to understand how changing greenhouse gas concentrations impact surface temperatures and the environment.

I am also very interested in research which provides decision makers with the tools, background, and scientific expertise to make sound environmental choices. This is a field of active learning for me.

I am also dedicated to education and public outreach. In my graduate work at the University of California Santa Cruz I helped to teach undergraduate courses in Marine Geology, Oceanography, Field Geology, the History of Life, and Hydrology. Again, more information can be found in the above links.

In my spare time I love hiking, ultimate frisbee, and rock climbing.

View my LinkedIn Profile for recent updates.

I’ve started a blog at the Columbia’s Earth Institute exploring CO2 research.